The Trinketeer – 5e Homebrew Class

The Trinketeer is a custom homebrew class for Dungeons & Dragons 5th edition, allowing the player to create custom modular trinkets for a large variety of effects. Currently there is only one subclass – the Specialty of Traps – but is formatted for the possibility of expansion. Although the Trinketeer is not a spellcasting class, many of the trinkets can feel like spells or function similarly.

The Specialty of Traps is designed for more cunning individuals who want to add an extra level of strategy and planning to their D&D combats. With the possibility for the player to make custom bear traps, timer traps, wire traps, proximity mines, and small dimensional portals, a clever trap maker will always have a tool at their arsenal.

Although the class is similar in nature to the official artificer, this class is unique enough to warrent it’s own classification, similar to the difference between a wizard and a sorcerer.

The module was created using Homebrewery, and sources for images are in the document, with additional watercolor effect made by myself.

If you would like to download this class and play with it for yourself, click here to view a pdf!

Trapped!

You all have been living together for at least several weeks. Recently, people started picketing outside your house. More keep coming. They’re all angry. A Mob is forming. Words on the wind. “Kill them.” “Burn the whole thing down.” Survive against The Mob.

Trapped is a one-page tabletop RPG where your primary goal is to survive the ever growing mob. Trapped is an incredibly flexible system that fits into any level of fantasy or time period that uses a unique mechanic to decide the outcome of uncertain events. Instead of rolling dice, you draw cards from a standard deck of playing cards.

Click here to see the RPG for yourself!

This one-page tabletop RPG was designed for a tabletop RPG class, where we had to design an RPG based on a Grimm’s fairy tale. I selected The Owl, which tells a tale of an owl who rested in a barn, but was mistaken for a monster by the farmers. Many try to rid the barn of the foul beast, but none are brave enough to do so. Ultimately the angry mob decides to burn the barn down with the animal inside.

Trapped! plays out from the owl’s perspective, where the angry mob gets ever closer and closer to killing everyone inside. In order to capture the feeling of an uncontrollable angry mob, I created the deck system instead of rolling dice, in order to phisically represent how much time the players have left. The additional element of randomness also adds to the feeling of the angry mob, as they become further enraged for no apparent reason.

I’m particularly proud of the relationship mechanic I created for character creation, where each player determines their relationship with the player on the right. This leads to emergent gameplay, and informs the player how they should be interacting with other person, which is useful when a game shouldn’t last more than an hour or two.

Fool’s Errand

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Fool’s Errand is a card-based dungeon crawler with deckbuilding elements! Explore through multiple dungeons fighting off manical jesters as you continue on a fool’s errand.

This game was created over the course of 4 weeks in April 2020 with a team of 3 people.

For this project, I was both the lead designer of the project, and programmed any aspect of the game that involved the cards.

This prototype was created as an expirement in communication without using any form of text – numbers or letters. I was inspired by traditional playing cards and their design, and made a dungeon crawler with the intention of eventually building in more deck building elements. Additionally, we experimented with discretization, making the game real time rather than turn based as is genre convention for card based games.

This real-time factor made the game interesting and unique, but made the already difficult to understand game even more confusing, where players were getting frustrated.

This project was voted on by a class of 30 to continue development, where we gained another teammate. Over the next three weeks, we focused on refining the core of the game before expanding into new territory, emphasizing usability.

Now the game is at a state where the core gameloop is entertaining, and additional content can now be built out of this core system!

Click here if you would like to see a code sample, and Click here if you would like to play the game for yourself!

HexiDecimal

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

HexiDecimal is a fast paced action game, which is a new take on hacking, where you eliminate the floating packets of data while avoiding the firewalls looking to take you out! But be careful – you leave a trail of destruction in your wake and can’t move onto those hexes!

HexiDecimal was created as a prototype in March 2020 within a single week as a team of 2 people.

The project explored mixing discretization and continuous structures, both in the game’s movement and actions taken, where the actions and movement are all very discrete, while all enemy movement is completely continuous.

For this prototype, I came up with the original concept, as well as programmed the main player, camera movement, and all of the particle effects.

Click here for a code sample, and click here if you would like to play the game yourself!

Going Up

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Going Up is a single player puzzle platformer for the PC where you are a slime trying to escape a steampunk factory!

Gravity is all out of sorts in this factory though, so whenever you let go of a surface, you fall to what you concieve is “up”. However, there is no true up. Will you be able to escape the factory or will you get disoriented and never find your way out?

Click here to download the game to play it for yourself!

This game was selected to be developed as a final project in the University of Southern California’s Introduction to Game Development class.

I spearheaded a two-person team in the ideation and iteration of core mechanics and level design. The levels are designed to create interesting puzzles through a simple set of mechanics. As part of this level design, I also tested the levels to ensure functionality and that they were challanging the player.

I was responsible for over 80% of the programming within Unity, which you can see a code sample here. As part of the project, I designed the stages with usability tutorialization principles to make teaching learning the game’s mechanics fun and engaging while also being educational.

In addition, I created a press kit for this game, which you can see at goingupgame.github.io. The final level of the game has a large jump in difficulty, since it was intended to showcase the complexity possible with the game’s simple set of mechanics.